Eminem Says Rapping Is a Therapy for His Mental Health and Addiction Battles

Having battled addictions to prescription drugs, the 49-year-old ‘Godzilla’ rapper, who was born Marshall Bruce Mathers III, was hours from dying when he was hospitalized back in 2007.

AceShowbizEminem has found it therapeutic to rap about his mental health and addiction battles. The 49-year-old rap star made the admission during her interview with Westside Boogie on Shade 45’s “Sway in the Morning” radio show.

When it was mentioned he uses music to explore his “luggage,” the “Without Me” hitmaker responded, “Well, I think that’s, that’s one of the great things about rap music is that, you know, you could put so much of your life in it.” He added, “I was just trying to figure out how to expand on that and I kinda got lost.”

Referring to 32-year-old Boogie’s new album, the spitter added, “It’s therapeutic and it’s, you know, that’s how it’s always been for me. But with this album, with this new Boogie album, the, the title, everything is f******, everything’s great.”

Born Marshall Bruce Mathers III, the rapper continued, “And it’s like, you know, watching him, watching him just keep getting better and better and better is incredible too.” He went on, “And he’s got so much of his life weaved in this album. You know what I’m saying? Like, I think that it’s like, it’s therapeutic.”

Having battled addictions to prescription drugs, Eminem was hours from dying when he was hospitalized in 2007 after a methadone overdose that doctors told him was the equivalent of ingesting four bags of heroin. He has drawn parallels between himself and troubled Elvis Presley on his new “The King and I” track with Cee-Lo from the soundtrack for Baz Luhrmann’s new “Elvis” film.

Co-produced by Dr. Dre, it sees Eminem rap, “I’m about to explain to you all the parallels between Elvis and me/ It seems obvious: one, he’s pale as me/ Second, we both been hailed as kings/ He used to rock the Jailhouse, and I used to rock The Shelter.”

The “Godzilla” hitmaker adds, “I stole black music, yeah, true, perhaps used it/ As a tool to combat school kids/ Kids came back on some bathroom s**t/ Now I call a hater a bidet/ ‘Cause they mad that they can’t do s***.”

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